FAQ
 
What is Himalayan Trekking?
What do I have to carry?
What are the paths like?
Where do we sleep and who does the cooking?
Will we meet local people?
Photography
Culture, History and cities
Mountain flights and road journeys
Flexibility
Who's in-charge?
Group Size
Who travels with us?
What is the food like?
Can special dietary requirements be accommodated?
What is the toilet situation?


What is Himalayan Trekking?
A wayfarer trek is a small group adventure - walking holiday. Experienced leaders accompanied by local guides lead our treks. On average it involves 5 - 8 hours hiking per day, including lunch stop somewhere on the trail. A common misconception is that if you are a slow walker you may hold people back - not so! Our leaders and guides will constantly remind you that you are not on a race! During the day the group members often 'string out' and there will usually be an hour or so between the first to arrive in camp and the last. You walk at your own pace and stop when you feel like. There will always be a crew member at the front and rear ensuring no one gets lost.

What do I have to carry?
You carry only the items you need during the day, such as your camera, water bottle and jacket in a light day sack; porters, horses, mules or yaks carry the main luggage.

What are the paths like?
Walking usually starts in foothills / villages / towns and works its way upwards into the mountains. The routes are centuries old village / trade paths either on the floors of the valleys or gorges, following ridge lines, passing through forests, contouring hillsides, or crossing passes from one region to the next. They connect villages and lead to remote monasteries, using suspension bridges to cross-rivers. The longer, harder treks may cross glaciers and snow covered passes. Occasionally you might wade small streams.

Where do we sleep and who does the cooking?
On a trek / river expedition / MTB trip you will be sleeping in a tent and eating in a mess tent. The dining venues are also a place for evening games, reading or writing diaries. Tables and chairs / stools and lanterns / candles are supplied by us. There is a full team of local staff to erect and dismantle tents. They cook, serve meals, wash-up and produce hot water for washing and 'bed tea'. They are great fun and invariably there are end of trek parties with singing and dancing. They have a separate kitchen tent and additionally there will be a toilet tent. There is always plenty of food and our cooks have a wide repertoire of Indian, Chinese and European dishes. Special diets can be catered for. On some of our treks we use 'tea houses' or hotels and lodges.

Will we meet local people?
Remote active travel is a wonderfully relaxing pursuit in the company of like-minded people. It gives you a chance to make new friends, and enables you to interact with local people, who will surely invite you into their homes for yak-butter tea, or Chang (barley beer). Himalayan tribes-people are open hearted, generous and often display a mischievous sense of humor. The time in their company is often one of the fondest memories you bring home.

Photography
The air in the mountains is so clear that it is ideal for capturing those special memories. Sunsets and sunrises are often spectacular. The remoteness and the thin air provide exceptional opportunities for 'star gazing'.

Culture, History and cities
Part and parcel of adventure travel is the raw excitement of the atmosphere, sights and sounds of ancient towns and villages, smell of alien cuisine and the visual and mental surprises, new traditions and folklore throw your way. The very name fires the imagination: Leh, Kargil, Changthang, Zanskar, Thimpu, Gangtok and the like. In towns we use charming, hotels / lodges of character. We use the best available. We have found that a little luxury before and after an adventure is always welcome. The history, culture traditions and religion are an important facet of your trip; we certainly recommend plenty of reading beforehand, as we love to say that a place is nothing without its people and other life forms.

Mountain flights and road journeys
A trekking holiday almost certainly involves a Himalayan road journey or two, by private car, jeep or bus, and/or a flight in a small aircraft close to main peaks. These are hugely exciting in their own right.

Flexibility
Our itineraries allow a degree of flexibility in case of roadblock caused by landslide, breaking down of a vehicle, or cancellation of flight due to bad weather. We aim to provide the highest quality service available in the Himalaya, but one cannot legislate for the unexpected. Anyone booking one of our trips should possess a spirit of adventure, an easy going, laid back attitude and a capacity for tolerance coupled with a good sense of humour! Do not expect an itinerary cast in stone; this by definition is definitely Adventure Travel.

Who's in-charge?
Experienced local leaders lead long trips into remote areas, our belief is that no one knows the area better than a local.

Group Size
We only take a maximum of 12 – 15 clients per trip. But that does not mean that’s the minimum size required. As being the trip operators ourselves, we can run a trip with even a single client on it! This distinguishes us quite a bit from all other outfits.

Who travels with us?
Many clients of ours have been coming from all walks of life. The ages of our clients start from as young as mid 20s to their 60s, although the medium of communication is English / Hindi. The vast difference in age groups have never proven to be a problem as most people on our trips are like-minded questing for adventure and fun.

What is the food like?
An integral part of the experience… Sampling the local cuisine is a BIG part of the travelling experience. Our trips include most of meals but we really want you to sample local cuisines. On treks and expeditions we include all meals. Our meals are always fresh, hearty and wholesome.

Can special dietary requirements be accommodated?
Usually it is no problem for us to meet special diet requirements. Be sure to let us know of any restrictions when you sign up for the trip.

What is the toilet situation?
In the cities / towns, Wayfarer guests stay in wonderful hotels / lodges that have Western-style private bathrooms. Guesthouse or dormitory accommodations on some of the more adventuresome trips into rural areas may be more basic, such as with shared bathroom facilities. The group camping gear on our treks includes toilet tent, with improvised "Western Seats". These are secluded within a small tent, which is set away from camp.

Contact our travel consultants now and start planning your holiday!

 

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